A Response to Concerns from the Extinction Rebellion Action of 28 June

I’ve been alerted to a number of concerns held by those attending the peaceful protest action at the Royal Society of Victoria (RSV) last Friday afternoon for the cancellation of DELWP’s community consultation and subsequent closure of the Society’s building. This statement is provided at my earliest opportunity to help clarify matters from the Society’s perspective. As an independent organisation, the Society’s relationship with government is complex. In some cases we act as a partner, in some as a service provider, and in others as a venue provider.

Science Gossip: the stories trees share

The inaugural Science Gossip event was held at the Royal Society of Victoria on the 15th of May. The event planted artists, philosophers, the public and scientists in common ground to discuss and unravel the secrets of forest communication, complexities and communities. Dr Renee Beale invited RSV members and guests to ‘really see trees.’

Gamble, Drink, Consume, Repeat: Breaking the Cycle

The current treatment model for addictive behaviours involves treating people based on the substance or behaviour they are dependent on; however, there are usually underlying psychological reasons for their addictions that might not go away (i.e. treating someone for alcoholism who drinks due to an earlier trauma doesn’t remove the injury of the underlying trauma). The solution is to ‘focus on underlying drivers, not surface symptoms of problematic behaviours’. Rather than assessing and focusing on a diagnostic “what”, Professor Yücel and BrainPark are focusing on the “why”. 

The Royal Society of Victoria’s Science Awards & Prizes: Call for Submissions & Nominations

The month of May is our peak awards season at the Royal Society of Victoria, with all three major programs open for submissions at once, each recognising excellence at different moments of the science career cycle. Please consider the talented scientists in your life, and encourage (or prepare) a submission for the Young Scientists Research Prizes, the Phillip Law Postdoctoral Award for the Physical Sciences, and the RSV Medal for Excellence in Scientific Research.

The Science (and Art) of Sport

The pressure to apply science to professional sport has accelerated, and there is more data being generated in sport than ever before. With better tools to manage and detect that data, the technology and analysis behind professional and recreational sport will continue to improve, giving players the opportunity to improve alongside them. Associate Professor Sam Robertson and Professor Damian Farrow are dedicated to advancing technologies, data capacities, and analytics to help both professional and recreational athletes.