The Royal Society of Victoria is our State’s scientific society, founded in 1854. The Society convenes an independent community of science practitioners, educators, industrialists and enthusiasts to promote the understanding and utilisation of scientific knowledge for the benefit of the State of Victoria. Membership is open to any individuals or organisations keen to be involved.

We broker engagement between practitioners of Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics & Medicine (STEMM) and the broader Victorian community, seeking to improve general scientific literacy, evidence-based decision making and the translation of scientific knowledge into purposeful actions in our State.

Headquartered on Wurundjeri land in a heritage-listed building at 8 La Trobe Street, Melbourne, the Society provides a statewide program of outreach, partnerships, lectures, forums, programs and projects. A further overview of who we are and what we do is available at our About Us page.

Recent Updates

What Can Brain Cells on a Microchip Tell Us About Intelligence?


- Whether “intelligence” can be created within hardware is a fascinating question, and one that remains unanswered despite significant efforts. In contrast, biological intelligence from a neural source offers a “ground truth” of opportunity. As such, the question becomes not ‘if’ general intelligence can arise from something artificial, but ‘how’.

Tackling Invasive Species


- How big is the problem of invasive species? In the words of Deakin University's Professor Euan Ritchie, ‘the short answer is: it’s massive’. Invasive genes and species are one of the biggest environmental problems facing Australia and the number one cause of native species extinctions. They also cause immense economic and cultural damage; since the 1960s, Australia has variously spent and incurred losses amounting to $390 billion due to invasive species.

Seeking Reforms for Biodiversity Recovery


- "The main thing for everyone to be aware of is that the extinction crisis is everyone's problem," says RSV President Rob Gell AM. "It's no good sitting back waiting for somebody else to deal with it. Governments, industries, communities, academics, First Nations - we all have a responsibility, and a role to play. The challenge comes from knowing exactly which role is yours... and how to coordinate the collective effort."

Towards Conservation & Recovery of Victoria’s Biodiversity – Report for Changemakers


- This report and position paper from the Royal Society of Victoria (RSV) addresses the conservation and recovery of Australia’s unique biodiversity, particularly in the State of Victoria. It summarises the current state of reviews, responses and policies in Victoria in the broader Australian and global context, with recommendations for action.

Protecting Your Health From Severe Hot Weather


- Like a high-performance vehicle, the human body is very finely calibrated for peak efficiency. The brain regulates body temperature, keeping it within a very narrow range for optimum functioning. A balance must be struck between heat generating activities (exercise, metabolism, ingesting hot food and drink ), heat loss (sharing heat through closeness or touch, breathing, sweating, and other excretions) and the environment.

Young Scientist Research Prizes 2022


- Every year, final year PhD candidates present their doctoral studies to the Royal Society of Victoria, competing for prizes recognising excellence in Victoria’s young researchers. Eight finalists present under the four categories: Biological Sciences, Biomedical & Health Sciences, Earth Sciences, and Physical Sciences. This year our finalists were selected from a highly competitive field of 63 applicants.
Mike Flattley, Tien Kieu, Rob Gell

Science for the People – New Victorian Government Support for the Inspiring Victoria Program


- If we want a young person from disadvantaged circumstances to achieve good educational and employment outcomes in the near future, or open broader employment options for young adults against the currents of their cultural and economic context, then we need to foster STEMM literacy in the lives of whole communities.

What’s in the Water? Part Two


- Aquatic systems, by their nature, distribute pollutants widely and effectively. Port Phillip Bay is currently impacted by a range of introduced pollutants and its long-term viability needs to be reassessed. New standards and technologies should be reconsidered, and system-wide thinking applied to the management of our limited water resources; particularly in a time of climate change and population growth. Business as usual will *not* be the solution.

Too Late to Save: The Extinct Australian Species


- The fate of the thylacine was not an isolated incident in Australia’s recent history – rather, it represents a story repeated so often that it lacks the shocking impact it should have. To compare with a different story that regularly draws greater national focus: every 4 years Australia has sent athletes to compete at the Olympic Games, while every 2.34 years Australia has completely removed another species from existence.