The Royal Society of Victoria is the State’s oldest scientific society, a part of Australia’s intellectual life since 1854. The Society convenes an independent community of science practitioners, educators, industrialists and enthusiasts to advocate for and advance the value, prestige, excellence and visibility of scientific education, research methodology and achievement for the benefit of the State of Victoria.

We promote an understanding of Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics & Medicine (STEMM) to the Victorian community, explaining the important role of rigour in the scientific method to inform scientific literacy and objective decision making in our state.

Located in a heritage-listed building at 8 La Trobe Street, Melbourne, the Society provides a dynamic program of outreach, partnerships, lectures, forums, programs and projects concerned with increasing community science engagement, scientific literacy and evidence-based decision making. A further overview of who we are and what we do is available at our About Us page.

Recent Updates

Surviving the Journey: Protecting Astronauts from Space Radiation


- NASA's Artemis program is preparing to send the first woman and next man to the South Pole of the Moon as soon as 2024. With the return of humans to space, we must think about how our astronauts will be protected from the constant bombardment of cosmic and solar radiation, without the protection of Earth's magnetic field. Experimental physicist Dr Gail Iles delved into the current methods in use and under development.

Why the world needs ecologists: a call to fight the extinction crisis


- Following the United Nations Global Assessment of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services report, Professor Brendan Wintle discussed and celebrated the crucial role that ecologists can play (and are playing) in co-designing and implementing solutions to the extinction crisis, in partnership with private land conservation organisations, Indigenous land managers, developers, and governments.
Let's Torque

Let’s Torque – 2021 Competition Now Open


- Welcome to Let's Torque, a SciComm organisation for undergraduates, where you can participate in trivia events against other universities, attend state-of-the-art immersive workshops, and see SciComm like never before! Check out our newly opened Public Speaking competition (where you can compete for prize money and other winnings!), which has kickstarted the careers of many past competitors.

Anthropocene Now


- The term "Anthropocene" was first used 20 years ago to describe a new epoch of geological time, coinciding with the start of the Industrial Revolution around 1750. It indicates a transition out of the Holocene into a new age - the age of human impact. This term has incited great debate amongst the scientific community as, in order for a new new geologic epoch to be accepted, we need to demonstrate our impact on the rock strata around and beneath us. This was achieved in 2019.

Resilient Forests: ensuring the Australian bush survives a changing climate


- Professor Patrick Baker, Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology at the University of Melbourne, explains how tree rings can tell us about a landscapes climate history, and prove a worrying trend towards more extreme weather events and bushfires as a result of climate change. His studies have shown that bushfires are becoming more widespread and hotter than ever before, not just scarring trees - but killing them.

Championing Translation & Commercialisation of Australian Medical Research


- Australia has a vibrant medical technology and pharmaceutical (MTP) sector, recognised globally for its excellence and innovation. With nearly 1,300 companies and an exceptionally skilled workforce of 68,000 across industry and research, the MTP sector is a major contributor to the Australian economy. Dr Rebecca Tunstall from MTPConnect leads collaborative teams to drive connectivity, innovation and productivity in the sector.

The Phoenix Schools Program: resurrecting lab equipment for the next generation of scientists


- During Andrew Gray's efforts in setting up BioQuisitive, he realised a large amount of old but otherwise high-quality scientific equipment was being consigned to landfill from professional laboratories. Joining forces with Samuel Wines, the Phoenix School Program was born.
RSV Building

Supporting our Heritage


- Following a call for submissions in the 2020 Review of the World Heritage Management Plan by Heritage Victoria, the Royal Society of Victoria provided input on 27 July 2020. Sadly, this submission has not featured in the subsequent report, nor has it been acknowledged via other channels when queried, so we are reproducing it here for general consideration.

International Day of Women and Girls in Science


- In 2015 the United Nations General Assembly declared 11th February as a day to celebrate, recognise and encourage women and girls in STEM fields around the world! This initiative hopes that increased visibility will strengthen interest and support for the next generation of girls who want develop their passions for science.